What Could Possibly Go Wrong?

Hey there! How’s it going?

The incoming e-mail waved at me.

It continued: If you’re a fiction writer, chances are that you’ve had to fight off a powerful case of plotilitis. Also known as writer’s block, this chronic condition has symptoms that include loss of hair, crippling headaches, and severe concentration problems.

Uhh, yes. I’m stuck right now somewhere between Joe Mayfield at a biotech incubator in Florida and Weezy chasing an hacker in Bethesda, Maryland.

The e-mail continues: And, luckily, we have the solution for you.

I’m all ears 👂👂

Meet our brand-new Plot Generator, which has more than 1 million* story combinations to inspire you. Simply choose from our fantasy, mystery, romance, sci-fi, and drama genres. You’ll get characters, a theme, a setting, and even a plot twist… with just one click of the finger! 

Characters without depth in places the author has no familiarity with, themes considered only superficially. What could go possibly go wrong?

Play, Write, and Learn

“I’m going to go home and sell my guitar.”

This is the standard and appropriate form of reverence when a journeyman guitar player hears someone truly gifted. It is now common to believe that repetition (Malcolm Gladwell’s 10,000 hour rule, for example) will bring greatness.  Maybe. But hard to believe when you hear a truly talented person play. 

I have played guitar for many years, probably put in nearly 10,000 hours. I am still a journeyman player – decent, good on my best days. But I’m not selling my guitar … it gives me joy to play.

And I’m not quitting writing, either.

I’ve just finished two books that are so well written that I cringe when I compare them to my writing. Golden State (Ben Winters) is a mystery novel set in a future California that looks a lot like current LA. The descriptive writing and development of the main character is so good that the holes in the plot don’t matter a bit. The Tsar of Love and Techno (Anthony Marra) is entirely different: a book-length series of short stories loosely but masterfully connected. The descriptions, aphorisms and observations are brilliant. The book is not something one reads all at once any more than one eats a whole box of chocolates in one sitting. The words are so carefully chosen that they must be appreciated at slow speed. 

Play, Yes, that’s it … admire and learn. And keep the guitar.