About John Rogers

I have thought of myself as a writer for most of my adult life. In 2011, I became a fiction writer full time. I studied creative writing as an English major in college. Then came family and career. I worked in finance and biotech and did a wonderful stint in Vienna. Now, I have the opportunity to use those experiences as the substrate for my stories. My first novel takes on the world of Big Data and the very timely issue of cyber war. The second uses the manipulation of financial derivatives as impetus for attempted murder during a trip from Vienna to Budapest on the Danube. I have taken writing instruction at the Cape Cod Writers Conference and from The Loft in Minneapolis. I am finding writers’ groups to be very helpful as concept editors, as well as practical advice from the published authors. I am in three such groups. I have taken writing instruction at the Cape Cod Writers Conference and from The Loft in Minneapolis.

What Goes Around

I want to step aside from the inexorable (I hope) progress toward publication of Fatal Score for today’s post.

 I’m reading a fine book on the history of writing, The Written Word: The Power of Stories to Shape People, History and Civilization, by Martin Puchner.  It has all sorts of fascinating facts, but what struck me today was his reminder that the great thinkers of the early age of literacy didn’t write things down. Socrates needed Plato; Jesus, the Disciples; Confucius and the Buddha, followers and students.  In particular, Plato has Socrates complaining (Puchner’s words): “You couldn’t ask a piece of writing follow-up questions; words would be taken out of context in which they were spoken.”  To hear is authentic; writing is a pale counterfeit of the thought behind the words to Socrates.

Interesting, then, that the standout growth segment of a slow-growing publishing market is audiobooks.  Maybe what goes around does, indeed, come around.

Check out the first chapter of the Fatal Score audiobook here.